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Who's your favourite all-time Canuck? Here's a list of some of the greatest Canucks.  Is your favourite on the list?

50 GREATEST CANUCKS 1-10 | 11-20 | 21-30 | 31-40 | 41-46

1. Stan Smyl
When the Canucks selected Stan Smyl in the 3rd round (40th overall) of the 1978 Amateur Draft, there were snickers from some of the other clubs. Smyl, you see, was only 5'8" and was a poor skater. But he had helped lead the New Westminster Bruins to two Memorial Cup Championships and their coach, Punch McLean, assured Canuck GM Jake Milford that he'd never be sorry he'd picked "The Steamer". His drive and will to win would overcome any physical liabilities. How prophetic! Smyl became a fixture at right wing for 13 seasons in Vancouver and wound up leading the team in all-time games played (896), goals (262), assists (411) and points (673). He became team captain in 1982 and led the Canucks all the way to the Stanley Cup finals against the New York Islanders. In November 1991 he announced his retirement and the Canucks raised his jersey number 12 to the rafters at the Pacific Coliseum. He then turned to coaching and was an assistant to Vancouver's head coach for the next eight seasons. In June 1999, he was named head coach of Vancouver's top farm team, the Syracuse Crunch of the AHL, which he guided to a second-place finish.

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2. Thomas Gradin
In the summer of 1978, the Canucks changed their uniforms from the original hockey stick and rink logo design to the deep "V" and streaking skate. In keeping with this dramatic departure from tradition, the club also added a new coaching staff plus nine new players. One of these players was Thomas Gradin, a fleet Swedish forward who'd originally been drafted by Chicago. The Canucks obtained his rights in exchange for a second-round draft choice. Gradin would go on to be the Canucks top centre for eight seasons and finish third in all-time team scoring with 550 points. He also had 38 points in as many playoff games and led the team in post-season scoring in their 1982 march to the finals. Gradin wound up his NHL career with one season in Boston before returning to play in Sweden. For the past eight seasons, he has been Vancouver's top European scout.

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3. Tony Tanti
During the 1982-83 season, the Canucks were looking to boost their goal-scoring and took a chance by sending dependable Curt Fraser to the Chicago Black Hawks for an unproven rookie named Tony Tanti. As a junior with Oshawa, Tanti had broken scoring records set earlier by Wayne Gretzky and the locals, of course, were hoping he'd bring that scoring touch to the west coast. And he did. In his first full season as a Canuck (1983-84), he set a new club mark with 45 goals and added 41 assists for 86 points. He followed that up with 39, 39, 41 and 40-goal seasons, respectively. In eight Canuck seasons, Tanti totalled 250 goals and 220 assist for 470 points and he remains fifth overall in team scoring. He concluded his NHL career with brief stints in Pittsburgh and Buffalo and then resurrected it by playing five seasons in Berlin, Germany. He now resides in West Vancouver and is an agent for a wholesale flooring business.

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4. Richard Brodeur
After a stellar junior career with the Cornwall Royals, with whom he shared a Memorial Cup title in 1972 with fellow Canuck alumnus B.J. MacDonald, Richard Brodeur began his pro career as a member of the Quebec Nordiques of the WHA, despite being claimed in the 1972 Amateur Draft by the NHL New York Islanders. After seven seasons with the Nords, he returned to the NHL when the two leagues merged in 1979 and played briefly for the Islanders in 1979-80. He then was traded to Vancouver where he played the next seven seasons. In 1982, "King Richard" was brilliant in backstopping the Canucks all the way to the Stanley Cup finals against the Islanders. During his illustrious tenure with the Canucks, he won the coveted Molson Cup and unprecedented four times, earned 131 wins and six shutouts.

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5. Orland Kurtenbach
This big prairie boy turned pro with the Western Hockey League Canucks in 1957 and promptly won that league's rookie award. Those WHL Canucks were a farm club of the NHL New York Rangers, the team to which he graduated in 1960. He was traded to Boston, to Toronto and back to New York before the NHL Canucks selected him in the 1970 Expansion Draft. He was Vancouver's first team captain and was voted MVP in each of his first three seasons here. A nagging back ailment forced him into early retirement in 1974. All told, "Kurt" played 13 NHL seasons scoring 119-213-332 while collecting 628 penalty minutes (Kurtenbach was widely acknowledged as the most feared fighter of his era). He then turned to coaching, first with Canucks Tulsa farm club, then with the parent team from 1976 to 1978. He later coached Richmond and Chilliwack in the BC Junior League. "Kurt" is a longtime member of the Canuck Alumni Board of Directors, sat for years on the selection committee for the alumni's UBC scholarship program and remains an avid participant in alumni games. He was the 1986 winner of the Jake Milford Plaque for outstanding service to hockey in BC and was recently elected to the BC Hockey Hall of Fame.

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6. Garth Butcher
Three years into a stellar junior career with the Regina Pats, the Canucks made this rugged defenceman their first choice (10th overall) in the 1980 NHL Entry Draft. The two-time WHL first all-star turned pro with Vancouver in 1982-83 and remained a cornerstone on the Canuck blueline for the next nine seasons. Though not a prolific fighter, Butcher's aggressive style and reputation as a classic "needler" earned him a club record 1,668 penalty minutes during his Canuck career which spanned 610 games. (That mark was subsequently broken by Gino Odjick). After leaving the Canucks in 1991, he played for St. Louis, Quebec and Toronto before retiring in 1995. He now resides near Bellingham, WA from where he is the director of that city's minor hockey program.

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7. Don Lever
The Canucks selected this smooth-skating centre in the first round, third overall, of the 1972 NHL Amateur Draft, following a stellar career with the Niagara Falls Flyers (61 goals, 65 assists, 126 points in his final season, 1971-72). He showed rapid progress with Vancouver, going from 38 points in his rookie year to 48 the next and 68 in 1974-75. During the latter campaign, Lever connected for a career high 38 goals while helping propel the Canucks to their first Smythe Division Championship. Lever also set a club mark by playing in 437 consecutive games between Oct. 7, 1972 and Jan. 124, 1978 (a record later broken by Trevor Linden, 482 games). Lever served two seasons as Canucks captain ('77-78 and '78-79) and took part in 593 games for the Canucks, scoring 186 goals and 221 assists for 407 points, good for sixth place in all-time team scoring. He was traded to the Atlanta Flames on Feb. 8, 1980 in a multi-player transaction that brought Darcy Rota and Ivan Boldirev to Vancouver. He later played for Calgary, Colorado and New Jersey before retiring at the end of the 1986-87 season. He is now an assistant coach with the Buffalo Sabres.

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8. Jack McIlhargey
Jack McIlhargey was a Philadelphia Flyer back in the '70s when the team was known as "The Broad Street Bullies". And with 390 minutes in penalties in only 99 Flyer games, "Bucky", as he's nicknamed, fit the Philly mould nicely. In 1976-77, the Canucks were missing that element of the game and landed McIlhargey in a multi-player swap. It was a homecoming for McIlhargey, who was born in Edmonton but raised in North Burnaby, and he became an instant hit with Canuck fans. He played four seasons with the Canucks before returning for another stint with the Flyers. He concluded his playing career with two final seasons with the Hartford Whalers. He returned to Vancouver in 1985, became an assistant coach for the Canucks for seven seasons and then was head coach of their minor league affiliates from 1992 to 1999. He returned behind the Canucks bench as an assistant to Marc Crawford on June 18, 1999.

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9. Darcy Rota
The Chicago Black Hawks' first round draft pick in 1973 following an illustrious junior career with the WHL Edmonton Oil Kings. He played six seasons with the Hawks and two with the Atlanta Flames before a blockbuster, eight-player deal brought him back to his hometown, Feb. 18, 1980. Over the next four seasons, Rota played 289 games for the Canucks, scoring 120 goals and 116 assists for 236 points. His gritty play (6-3-9 and 54 penalty minutes) helped propel the Canucks to the finals in 1982. The following season (1982-83), he scored 42 goals and 81 points, and both of those totals remain club records for a Canuck left winger. He was forced to retire prematurely in 1984 after sustaining a serious neck injury. Throughout his career, he was nicknamed "The Mayor" because he loved to meet people and was a great community ambassador. He remained with the Canucks as their public relations director in the mid-'80s before pursuing other business interests, which included a stint as a TV broadcaster. Most recently, he coached and managed the Burnaby Bulldogs of the BC Junior Hockey League and is currently starting up a new team for that League based in Coquitlam.

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10. Harold Snepsts
One of the most popular players ever to don a Canucks uniform, Big Harold had two stints in Vancouver during his 17-year career. He played over 1,000 NHL games with the Canucks, Minnesota North Stars, Detroit Red Wings and St. Louis Blues. His 781 games with Vancouver is second only to the 896 played by his longtime teammate Stan Smyl. He's the only Canuck defenceman ever to be awarded a penalty shot and he scored on it. A four-time winner of the Babe Pratt Trophy as Canucks outstanding defenceman, Harold also played in two NHL All Star Games, including the first-ever in Vancouver in 1977. He was instantly recognized all around the NHL because he never wore a helmet and his presence was greeted everywhere by chants of "Haaaa-rold...Haaaa-rold!" At the conclusion of his playing career (1991), he turned to coaching, first in the International Hockey League and later as an NHL assistant in St. Louis. He recently spent two seasons as head coach of the WHL Portland Winterhawks but has now accepted a position with the NHL's Central Scouting Bureau.

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11. Trevor Linden
Anyone who doubted the dedication and focus of Trevor Linden had it instantly dispelled the night of Nov. 17, 1988 when the Canucks played the North Stars in Minnesota. That's the night he scored his first NHL hat trick. Remember, he was just 18 and fresh out of junior hockey (Medicine Hat Tigers). After the game, Linden stormed into the Canucks dressing room and slammed his stick against the wall. Oh, yes, he'd scored three goals, all right, but Vancouver lost the game 7-6, and that was all that mattered to Linden. Over the next 10 seasons, Linden showed that mettle to Canuck fans night after night...702 games' worth. He was a four-time winner of the Molson Cup and Cyclone Taylor Trophy as team MVP, and a two-time winner of both the Cyrus McLean Trophy (leading scorer) and the Canucks Most Exciting Player Award. He had six 30-goal-plus seasons for Vancouver and wound up with 247 goals and 322 assists for 569 points, good for second place in all time team scoring. The team's captain from 1991 to 1997, Linden also set the team's "Iron Man" record by appearing in 482 consecutive games. Off the ice, his dedication to service in the community was legendary and it rewarded him with the King Clancy Trophy in 1997. That prestigious NHL award is bestowed for "leadership qualities on and off the ice and for noteworthy humanitarian contributions to the community". He was traded to the New York Islanders for Todd Bertuzzi, Bryan McCabe and a draft pick (Jarkko Ruutu), Feb. 6, 1998. Just over a year later, the Isles dealt him to the Montreal Canadiens. On Mar. 13, 2001 he was dealt to Washington with Dainius Zubrus and a draft pick for Richard Zednik, Jan Bulis and Washington's First Round pick. Then as fate would have it he returned to his home team. On Nov. 10, 2001 he was dealt to Vancouver for a pair of draft picks. He calls Vancouver home in the off season and also spends a fair amount of time at his mountain retreat in Montana.

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12. Kirk McLean
One of the first trades made by GM Pat Quinn when he joined the Canucks in 1987 was arguably his best. He basically dealt Patrik Sundstrom to the New Jersey Devils in exchange for Kirk McLean and Greg Adams. McLean would go on to be the most successful goaltender in Canuck history while Adams was a top line winger for eight seasons. "Captain Kirk", as he was known, played 516 Canuck games, had 211 wins and recorded 20 shutouts. He led the entire NHL with 38 wins in 1991-92, won the Molson Cup three times and the Cyclone Taylor Trophy as team MVP twice. His finest performance, however, was during the playoffs of 1994 when he backstopped the Canucks in all 24 games enroute to the seventh game of the Stanley Cup finals. His pad-stacking, game-saving stop in the deciding game of Vancouver's first series against Robert Reichel and the Calgary Flames remains one of the most amazing saves in playoff history. McLean recorded four shutouts that spring. In 1997-98, he was traded to Carolina, then Florida, and finally to a two-year stint with the Rangers, where he wrapped up his stellar career in 2000-01. He remains Canucks' all time career leader among goalies in virtually all netminding categories, including shutouts (20) and wins (211). He's now a regular with the alumni hockey team where he can now be found skating as a forward.

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13. Pavel Bure
Devout Canuck fans will remember the night of Nov. 5, 1991...the Russian Rocket's first NHL game. It was against Winnipeg at the Pacific Coliseum. After a couple of tentative shifts, Bure gathered the puck behind his net and literally exploded down the right wing. He deked three Jets players with some astonishing moves and then burst in on the goalie. He failed to score but he made his point, anyway. Canuck fans had never seen anything like that before but, soon, it was almost a nightly occurrence. Bure did score on 34 other occasions that season and assisted on another 26 goals to record 60 points and easily capture the Calder Trophy as top NHL rookie. He then put together two straight 60-goal, 100-plus point seasons as he established himself as the most exciting player in the game. In the spring of 1994, he paced the rampaging Canucks with a League-leading 16 playoff goals as Vancouver came within a goal post of winning the Stanley Cup in the seventh game vs the New York Rangers. His overtime goal, which won the series against Mike Vernon and the Calgary Flames, is highlight reel material to this day. Bure played seven seasons with the Canucks and still holds 16 offensive team records. In that span, he captured the Molson Cup the Most Exciting Player Award and led the team in scoring four times each, was voted MVP on three occasions and appeared in four NHL All Star Games. But it all came to an end on Jan. 17, 1999 when, after demanding a trade and sitting out the season until then, he was dealt to the Florida Panthers in a blockbuster nine-player trade. He once again led the NHL in goals with 58 last season.

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14. Dave (Tiger)Williams
When the Canucks began play in 1979-80, they were a team without an identity. They sorely needed an injection of character players and GM Jake Milford set about remedial action. On Feb. 8, 1980, he landed Darcy Rota and Ivan Boldirev from the Atlanta Flames in exchange for team captain Don Lever. Then, just 10 days later, he engineered a deal to obtain Tiger Williams and Jerry Butler from the Leafs for Rick Vaive and Bill Derlago. Suddenly, Vancouver was a team with a new attitude. Their newfound grit combined with added scoring punch made them a team to be reckoned with and they soon found ways to win games on a consistent basis. Canuck fans soon discovered that Tiger was more than just a punch in the nose, much more. In his first full season in Vancouver (1980-81), he led the Canucks and the NHL in penalty minutes with 343, but he also scored a team high 35 goals! Tiger's brash demeanour was contagious and the following season the Canucks entered uncharted territory playoff series victories over the Flames, Kings and Black Hawks and a final series berth against defending Cup champions, the New York Islanders. Vancouver lost that series but had asserted themselves as a true contender, thanks in no small part to the contributions made by Williams. He was a Canuck for only five seasons but he remains one of the most unforgettable players ever to don a Vancouver jersey. He wound up his 14-year NHL career with brief stints in Detroit, Los Angeles and Hartford before retiring in 1988 as the NHL's all-time leader in penalty minutes with 3,966. He and his family remain in the Vancouver area where he is involved in real estate development. He's now heavily involved in a number of oldtimers' hockey tours and is a regular with the Canuck alumni.

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15. Gary Smith
Canuck media and fans knew they had a character on their hands when Gary Smith was introduced at his first press conference. Smith grabbed the microphone and told the gathered multitude: "Yes, folks, everything you've heard about me is absolutely true. I AM a great goaltender!" And though he played only three seasons in Vancouver, he raised the calibre of Canuck netminding to a whole new level. With a six-shutout performance in 1974-75, he was largely responsible for Vancouver's first Smythe Division title with a 38-32-10 record for 86 points. Smith played an amazing 72 games in goal that season and many NHL observers believed he should have won the Hart Trophy as NHL MVP instead of Flyers' captain Bobby Clarke. He backstopped the team to a second-place finish in 1975-76 and then was traded to the Minnesota North Stars for fellow-netminder Cesare Maniago. In just three Canuck seasons, the big netminder recorded 72 wins and 11 shutouts. All told, the nomadic Smith played for eight different NHL teams during his 14-year career, earning him the nickname "Suitcase". Smith remains in the Vancouver area where he is involved in thoroughbred horse racing.

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16. Patrik Sundstrom
When the Canucks drafted Patrik Sundstrom in the 9th round (175th overall) in the 1980 draft, most believed he'd be a longshot, at best, to make the NHL. But when he finally joined the team two years later after fulfilling his army obligations in Sweden, Canuck fans knew it was worth the wait. The ultra-smooth skating centre enjoyed a very respectable rookie season in 1982-83, scoring 23-23-46 in 74 games. But it was in his sophomore year that he began turning heads all around the League. Playing on a line with sniper Tony Tanti, Sundstrom lit it up to the tune of 38 goals and 53 assists for 91 points. His goal and point totals remain club records for a centre. Included in those numbers is a seven-point night (a goal and six assists) during a 9-5 win at Pittsburgh on Feb. 29, 1984. That mark remains a club record for most points by a player in one game and is just one off the all-time record of eight points in a road game co-held by Peter and Anton Stastny. Sundstrom followed that up with seasons of 68, 66 and 71 points to finish his Canuck career with 342 points in 374 games. He remains in 10th place in all-time team scoring. He was traded to New Jersey for Kirk McLean and Greg Adams on Sept. 15, 1987 and he went on to play another five seasons for the Devils before retiring in 1992. Incidentally, Patrik had a twin brother, Peter, who also played in the NHL, making them the first Swedish twins in League history.

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17. Andre Boudrias
When the St. Louis Blues sold Andre Boudrias for an undisclosed amount of cash in June, 1970, little did they know that the diminutive centre would go on to lead Vancouver in scoring in four of the club's first five seasons in the NHL. He had already played six seasons with Montreal, Minnesota and Chicago before playing briefly with the Blues. The 5-foot-8 pivot, nicknamed "Superpest" for his buzzsaw style of play, was amazingly consistent in point production, collecting 66, 61, 75 and 78 points from 1970-71 through 1974-75. He was voted the team's Most Exciting Player in both 1970-71 and 1971-72. His 62 assists in 1974-75 helped propel the Canucks to a first-place finish and remains a club record to this day. He also has second place in that department with 59 assists in 1973-74. Boudrias retired at the conclusion of the 1975-76 season having scored 388 points in 458 games. He is seventh in all-time Canuck scoring. He remained in the game, however, and is currently the head of pro scouting for the defending Stanley Cup champion New Jersey Devils.

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18. Dennis Kearns
Like his longtime teammate Andre Boudrias, Dennis Kearns was an absolute "steal", having been obtained for virtually nothing in the 1971 NHL Intra-League Draft after the team which held his rights, Chicago, failed to protect him. A classic "late bloomer" (he failed tryouts with three different junior teams and nearly quit the game at age 21), he was 26 when he joined the Canucks in 1971-72 following four seasons in the minors. But when he finally made the NHL, he was there to stay, and he quickly became the mainstay of the Canucks defensive corps. He played 10 seasons for Vancouver, scoring 321 points in 677 games. His point total remains a club record for defencemen which is co-held by Jyrki Lumme. Kearns had three straight 80-game seasons between 1975 and 1978 when he scored 51, 60 and 47 points respectively. His 55 assists in 1976-77 also remains a club record for defencemen. Kearns and his family reside in West Vancouver. He is involved in the insurance business and operates his own company.

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19. Petri Skriko
When the Canucks selected Petri Skriko in the 8th round (157th overall) of the 1981 NHL draft, it marked the first time the team had ever chosen a prospect from Finland. Due to army obligations in his homeland, Skriko didn't arrive in Vancouver until three years later, but Canuck fans quickly figured it was worth the wait. He scored 21 goals in his rookie season (1985-85) and then exploded for 38-40-78 to lead the Canucks in scoring the following season. In 1986-87, he had two three-goal games and one four-goal night all in the space of eight days in November! That outburst earned him NHL Player of the Month honours, making him the first Canuck ever to receive such an award. He also led Vancouver in scoring in 1988-89 with 30-36-66. He remained a Canuck until Jan. 16, 1991 when he was traded to Boston for a second round draft pick with which Vancouver selected Mike Peca in 1992. During his seven seasons here, Skriko totalled 171 goals, 202 assists and 373 points, good for 8th place in all-time team scoring. After Boston, he had very brief stints in Winnipeg and San Jose before returning to play in Europe at the conclusion of the 1992-93 season.

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20. Jyrki Lumme
The Montreal Canadiens chose this big, Finnish defenceman in the 1986 Entry Draft but his freewheeling style didn't sit well with Habs management, which preferred defensive blueliners. Lumme's creativity was just what Canuck GM Pat Quinn was looking for so he made a deal for the Finn, sending a second-round draft choice to the Canadiens. Lumme blossomed in Vancouver and, over the next eight seasons, scored 321 points to tie Dennis Kearns for first place in all-time scoring among Canuck defencemen. His 83 goals are the most of any Vancouver rearguard. Along the way, he captured the Babe Pratt Trophy as the team's top defenceman four times. Lumme played for Team Finland at the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano and then, that summer, he was signed as a free agent by his current team, the Phoenix Coyotes.

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21. Doug Lidster
Prior to 1980, the Canucks had very little success drafting U.S. college players. But that was about to change. With their 7th round selection, they chose Kamloops native Doug Lidster from Colorado College. Canuck fans wouldn't see "Liddy" for a while, though, because, prior to turning pro, he would finish his degree in business and then play one season with Team Canada and earn a berth on the 1984 Olympic Team. But he became a full-time Canuck in 1984-85 and would go on to enjoy a solid 15-year NHL career as a defenceman. Neither flashy nor nasty, Lidster simply got the job done...and done well. Always one of Canucks top conditioned players, the durable rearguard played nine full seasons with Vancouver, highlighted by the 1986-87 campaign when he scored 12-51-63. That point total remains a Canuck club record for defencemen and it earned him his third of four Babe Pratt Trophies as Vancouver's top blueliner. All told, Lidster played 666 games for Vancouver and scored 309 points, just 12 shy of the team record among defencemen. He later played for the New York Rangers and the Dallas Stars, winning a Stanley Cup with each of those teams before retiring in 1999. Lidster and his family have returned to his hometown of Kamloops, where he assisted the Canucks at their training camp last year.

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22. Glen Hanlon
Throughout the history of the Vancouver Canucks, there may have been goaltenders who put up better numbers than Glen Hanlon, but none was more intense nor competitive than the one they called "Carrot". The red-haired native of Brandon, Manitoba was selected in the 3rd round (40th overall) of the 1977 amateur draft from that city's junior Wheat Kings with whom he was an all star. He played primarily in the minors in 1977-78 but landed the Canucks starting role in 1978-79. Longtime Canucks observers will recall that you never talked to Hanlon on game day; he was totally consumed by the task at hand. And even though he played just four seasons in Vancouver, he loved his Canucks and wept openly the day he was traded to the St. Louis Blues (March 9, 1982). As a Canuck, Hanlon won 43 games and recorded 5 shutouts while winning the coveted Molson Cup in 1978-79 and 1979-80. Following his brief (16-game) stint with the Blues, he played four seasons with the New York Rangers and another five with Detroit before retiring in 1991. He then returned to Vancouver to become an assistant coach with the Canucks, a position he held for five seasons. In 1999-2000, he left Vancouver to take over as head coach of his current team, the Portland Pirates of the American Hockey League.

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23. Geoff Courtnall
When GM Pat Quinn pulled the trigger on a seven-player blockbuster deal at the 1991 trading deadline, it marked the start of a steady climb in the team's fortunes which would culminate in a trip all the way to the Stanley Cup finals three years later. One of the principals of that trade with the Blues was Geoff Courtnall who would be instrumental in leading Vancouver to both regular season and playoff success. The Duncan, BC native had already played for Boston, Edmonton and Washington before St. Louis deemed him expendable after only 66 games in 1990-91. In 1991-92, his first full season with Vancouver, he scored 23-34-57 and followed that up with 31-46-77 in '92-93, totals which included a League-leading 11 game-winning goals. In those seasons, the Canucks enjoyed unprecedented success, earning 96 points and 101, respectively. In '93-94, he scored 26-44-70 in regular season before going 9-10-19 in 24 playoff games, including a dramatic overtime winner vs. Calgary. Following the 1994-95 campaign, he re-signed with the Blues as a free agent and retired in 1999 as a result of a serious concussion. As a Canuck, Courtnall scored 242 points in 292 games (18th place, all-time). His NHL totals were 365-430-795 in 1,042 games.

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24. Greg Adams
When GM Pat Quinn traded Patrik Sundstrom to the New Jersey Devils for Greg Adams and Kirk McLean (Sept. 15/87), little did anyone know how great the dividends would be. McLean would go on to set virtually all Canuck netminding records over the next 11 seasons while Adams would score 369 points over eight seasons to sit in 9th place in all-time team scoring. A little-known prospect from Northern Arizona State University, he was never drafted, but rather signed as a free agent by the Devils. Adams performed well for three seasons in New Jersey, but was delighted to return to his home province (Nelson, BC) where he would blossom into a prolific NHL scorer. He enjoyed three 30+-goal seasons with the Canucks, his best season being 1987-88 when he had 36-40-76. That included a four-goal outburst in his very first game as a Canuck, during an 8-2 rout of St. Louis (Oct. 8/87). He perhaps saved his best performance for the famous playoff drive of 1994 when Vancouver went all the way to the Stanley Cup finals. That spring, Adams scored 6-8-14, including consecutive overtime winners to eliminate Toronto and begin the final series vs. the Rangers. What Adams may like to forget, however, is the dubious distinction of being awarded five penalty shots as a Canuck and failing to score on any of them. In April '95, the Canucks traded Adams to the Dallas Stars for Russ Courtnall. He played three seasons with the stars before being signed as a free agent by his current team, the Phoenix Coyotes.

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25. Chris Oddleifson
Chris Oddleifson was the first pick of the California Golden Seals in 1970 but never played a single game for that team. Instead, the Seals traded the lanky Brandon, Manitoba native to the Boston Bruins. Ironically, when the Bruins visited Oakland on Dec. 30/73, "Oddy" pumped in four goals in an 8-1 Boston romp. Of course, one of the NHL's hottest commodities back then was high-scoring Phil Esposito. The morning after Oddleifson's finest feat, the Oakland Tribune sports section headline read: "Seals Lose 8-1, But Esposito Held Off Scoresheet". Later that season, Oddleifson was traded to the Canucks and the tall centre remained with Vancouver for the remainder of his nine-year NHL career. He played 469 games for Vancouver and was the team's captain during the 1976-77 season. He scored 85 goals and 180 assists for 265 points, good for 17th place in all-time team scoring. He and his family reside in North Vancouver where he is a real estate agent. He's also an enthusiastic and active member of the Canuck Alumni team, which plays games for charity throughout the province.

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26. Ron Sedlbauer
When it was the Canucks turn to select their first player in the 1974 Amateur Draft, they wasted no time in choosing a big winger named Ron Sedlbauer from the Ontario Hockey Association, where he played for both Hamilton and Kitchener. At 6'3" and 200 pounds, Sedlbauer was a huge player for that era. It took him a while to become a Canuck regular, spending time in the minors in each of his first four pro seasons, but he still managed three 18-plus goal campaigns with Vancouver. In 1978-79, everything came together for the easy-going forward and nearly everything he touched turned to goals. At season's end, he had scored a club record 40 goals (including a team-leading 15 on the power-play) to erase the old mark of 38 by Bobby Schmautz. That record endured until 1983-84 when Darcy Rota scored 42. That was to be Sedlbauer's best season, however, and 32 games into the next schedule, he was traded to Chicago. After a brief stint with the Hawks, he was traded to Toronto where he finished his playing career in 1981. Upon his retirement, he joined his family's successful shoe business in Burlington, Ontario, where he now lives with his wife and children.

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27. Dennis Ververgaert
The Canucks selected Dennis Ververgaert with their first pick in the 1973 Amateur Draft from the OHA London Knights for whom he tallied 58 goals in his final year of junior. He easily captured the Canucks rookie award in his first season (1973-74) when he scored 26 goals and 31 assists for 57 points, record totals for a freshman that stood until 1982. His best season was 1975-76 when he had 37 goals and 34 assists for a club-leading 71 points to equal the team record for most points by a right winger co-held at the time by Bobby Schmautz. That performance caught the eye of All-Star Team coach Fred Shero, who selected him to represent Vancouver at the 1976 classic. "Vervy" responded by scoring two goals just 10 seconds apart to set an all-star game record, which would endure for 21 years (Owen Nolan scored two in 8 seconds in 1997). All told, Ververgaert played 409 games for the Canucks with totals of 139-165-304. He was traded to Philadelphia on New Year's Eve 1978 and played briefly with the Flyers and Washington Capitals before retiring in 1981. He returned to the Vancouver area and now resides with his family in Abbotsford where he works in the insurance business and hosts an annual charity golf tournament.

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28. Rick Lanz
Canucks thought they had hit the jackpot when, after selecting Rick Lanz in the 1st round (7th overall) of the 1980 Entry Draft, he scored in his very first NHL game, helping his new team to a 5-3 win over the visiting Detroit Red Wings (Oct. 10/80). Lanz and his family fled his native land, Czechoslovakia, when he was only nine years old. They settled in southern Ontario where he learned to play hockey and he enjoyed a fine junior career with Oshawa in the OHL. After sitting out most of his second NHL season with a torn ACL, Lanz blossomed into the playmaking defenceman Canucks management always thought he could be. He had 10-38-48 in 1982-83 and 18-39-57 the following season. Those totals are the third-highest in club history among blueliners and earned him the Babe Pratt Trophy as Vancouver's Most Outstanding Defenceman in 1983-84. He wound up playing seven seasons with the Canucks before moving on to a three-season stay with the Leafs and a one-game stop in Chicago before retiring as a player in 1992. He then did some pro scouting for Tampa Bay before returning to the west coast where he is now the head coach of the Langley Hornets of the BC Hockey League. He and his family reside in White Rock.

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29. Rick Blight
The Canucks selected this hard-shooting right winger in the 1st round (10th overall) following a brilliant junior career with the Brandon Wheat Kings. Blight quickly became a hit with Canuck fans as he scored 25 goals and 31 assists for 56 points in his rookie season (1975-76). He led the entire team the next season with 28-40-68, a performance that included a four-goal night vs. Pittsburgh. He also scored both goals in a 2-0 victory over the touring Moscow Dynamo team in December 1977. After 3 fine seasons, in which he scored a total of 187 points, Blight sustained a series of knee injuries, which forced him into early retirement following the 1982-83 season. All told, Blight scored 221 points in 324 Canuck games and remains in 21st place in all-time team scoring. As adept with a golf club as he was with a hockey stick, Blight was a scratch golfer who represented BC players in Willingdon Cup competition. Later, at a team function at the Vancouver Golf Club, Blight bet a teammate $100 that he could par the first hole in the dark...and he did! Following his retirement as a player, Blight returned to southern Manitoba where he's involved in his family's farm equipment business.

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30. Cliff Ronning
If Cliff Ronning had $100 for every time he's heard so-called hockey experts say he's too small to play this game, he'd likely have as much money as he's made in his 14-year NHL career. After a scorching junior career with the New Westminster Bruins in which he scored an amazing 484 points in three seasons, the St. Louis Blues decided to take a chance on the little 5'8" Burnaby native by selecting him in the 9th round (134th overall) in the 1984 Entry Draft. He played four seasons in St. Louis before "coming home" to Vancouver via a seven-player trade (March 5, 1991). His buzz-saw style became an instant hit with Canuck fans and he tallied 24-47-71 in his first full season as a Canuck (1991-92). One season later ('92-93), he enjoyed his finest NHL campaign with 29-56-85 and won the Fred Hume Award as Canucks Unsung Hero. In five seasons with Vancouver, Ronning played 366 games, scoring 112 goals and 216 assists for 328 points. He also collected 58 points in 72 playoff games, including 15 points in 24 games during Vancouver's drive to the finals in 1994. He was signed as a free agent by Phoenix in July 1996 and then traded to his current team, Nashville, on Oct. 31/98. Now 35, Ronning's closing in on 700 points and 900 games...not bad for a guy who "couldn't play".

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31. Gino Odjick
As a junior, Gino Odjick scored 23 goals in 141 games. He also had 725 penalty minutes! So when the Canucks picked him in the 1990 Entry Draft, they knew they weren't selecting a Wayne Gretzky. But when he made the big team in 1990-91, opposing teams knew the Canucks were not to be messed with. Oh, yes, the big, full-blooded Algonquin Indian fought many battles and amassed a staggering 1,285 penalty minutes in his first four seasons but he was far from just a one-dimensional player. He scored 31 goals and 33 assists during that span, as well, including a 16-13-29 season in 1993-94. Longtime Canuck fans will remember how he "brought down the house" at the Pacific Coliseum the night of Oct. 19/91 when he scored on a dramatic penalty shot against Mike Vernon to pace Vancouver to a 5-2 win over the much-hated Calgary Flames. He played seven-and-a-half seasons for Vancouver and led the team in penalties six times to amass a Canuck career record total of 1,946 minutes. On March 23, 1998, the Canucks traded Odjick to the New York Islanders for current defenceman Jason Strudwick. He played three seasons for the Islanders before they dealt him to his current club, the Philadelphia Flyers.

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32. Bobby Schmautz
Bobby Schmautz was a seasoned pro by the time he played his first game as a Canuck in 1970-71. The feisty Saskatoon native spent four seasons in the minors before he thought he'd made the NHL with the Chicago Black Hawks for whom he played 76 games between 1967 and 1969. But in 1969-70, he again found himself sent down, this time to Seattle of the Western Hockey League. But success would be just around the corner in the form of the NHL expansion Vancouver Canucks. "Schmautzie" started slowly, with seasons of 5 goals and 12, respectively. Then he suddenly put it all together and scored 38 goals and 33 assists for 71 points in 1972-73, a performance that included two 4-goal games and a 3-goal night. He was traded to Boston for Chris Oddleifson (Feb. 7/74) and he played seven seasons for the Bruins and enjoyed five 20-plus goal campaigns. Part way through 1979-80, the Bruins sent him to the Oilers who, in turn, traded him to the Colorado Rockies after just 29 games. And following a brief 20-game stint in the Mile High city, he found himself a free agent. When Canuck GM Jake Milford heard about it, he immediately signed Schmautz to a second go-around with Vancouver. He played one last season with the Canucks in 1980-81, scoring 27-34-61, and then retired to join his brothers in the roofing business in Portland, Oregon, where he still lives. His Canuck totals read 108-104-212 in 285 games and he remains in 21st place in team scoring.

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33. Dunc Wilson
Dunc Wilson is one of a handful of ex-Canuck who did two tours of duty with Vancouver. He was obtained from Philadelphia in the 1970 NHL Expansion Draft and was the team's No. 1 netminder during its first three years in the NHL (1970-1973), appearing in 131 games over that span. Then, after a five-year absence, he concluded his NHL career back in Vancouver with a 17-game stint in 1978-79. In between, he played with Toronto, New York Rangers and Pittsburgh. As a Canuck, the Toronto native appeared in 148 games to rank fourth in that department among Vancouver goalies. One of his two shutouts with Vancouver occurred on Oct. 27, 1971 at Maple Leaf Gardens when Vancouver and the Leafs skated to a 0-0 tie. All told, Dunc played 10 seasons in the NHL, winning 80 games and recording 8 shutouts. An all-around athlete, Wilson played senior lacrosse for the Vancouver Burrards during the off-season and was also an excellent golfer. Following his retirement, he worked as a longshoreman in Vancouver, but now lives in Rossland, BC, where he is a heavy equipment operator.

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34. Cesare Maniago
Cesare Maniago had the distinction of playing for 14 different professional teams-including 4 in the NHL-during his 18-year career. The big netminder from Trail, BC, rose to prominence in 1961-62 when he won the Eastern Professional Hockey League's leading goalkeeper award with Hull-Ottawa. He got a brief taste of NHL action with Toronto (7 games) and Montreal (14 games) but endured 4 more seasons in the minors before graduating to the majors for good with the New York Rangers in 1965-66. When the Rangers left him unprotected, he was scooped up by the Minnesota North Stars in the 1967 NHL Expansion Draft. Maniago went on to enjoy 9 solid seasons with the North Stars before being traded to the Vancouver Canucks for fellow-goalie Gary Smith (Aug. 23, 1976). And even though he played only 2 seasons with the Canucks, he certainly left his mark, winning the Molson Cup and the Cyclone Taylor Trophy as team MVP in each campaign. He played 47 games in 1976-77 and 46 in 1977-78 while recording 27 wins and 2 shutouts. His NHL career included 568 games, 189 wins, 30 shutouts and a career goals-against average of 3.27. Following his retirement, Cesare operated a sporting goods business.

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35. Jim Sandlak
Most longtime fans probably don't realize it, but Jim Sandlak is one of a dozen ex-Canucks who played 500 games or more with the hockey club...509 to be exact. Vancouver selected the hulking 6'4", 220 lbs winger with their first pick (4th overall) in the 1985 NHL Entry Draft from the London Knights of the OHL. He came from hockey roots, too, as his father was a linesman in the American Hockey League. In his rookie year (1986-87), the Kitchener, Ontario native scored 15-21-36 to finish 9th among NHL freshmen and earn a berth on the NHL's All-Rookie Team. He went on to play 9 seasons with the Canucks, twice reaching the 40-point plateau (20-20-40 in 1988-89 and 16-24-40 in 1991-92). During the latter season, the Canucks captured the Smythe Division title and Sandlak scored 4-6-10 in 13 playoff games. Nicknamed "House" because of his size and enormous appetite (he once ate 6 hot dogs following a Canucks open practice at the Pacific Coliseum), Sandlak played 2 seasons with the Hartford Whalers before retiring in 1996. He and his family now reside in southern Ontario where he is involved in the grocery business.

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36. Curt Fraser
In the 1978 Amateur Draft, the Canucks selected high-scoring Bill Derlago with their first pick. They opted for "toughness" with their second choice and found it in Curt Fraser, a rugged left winger who starred with the WHL Victoria Cougars. When the team convened for training camp that fall, Fraser found himself the perfect fit on a forward line which included Thomas Gradin at centre and Stan Smyl on the right side. That line stayed together for 4 seasons, improving every year along the way. Fraser's point totals went from 35 in his rookie season to 42, 49 and 67 in 1981-82, his last full campaign with the Canucks. When the Canucks found themselves playoff-bound in 1982, that's where Fraser's toughness paid off. Never one to go looking for trouble, Fraser nonetheless neutralized most opponents' enforcers enroute to the Stanley Cup finals and picked up 98 PIM along with 3-7-10 in 17 games. He was traded to Chicago for Tony Tanti (Jan. 6/83) and enjoyed nearly 6 solid seasons in the Windy City before moving on to Minnesota where he concluded his playing career in 1990. His Canuck totals were 92-114-206 in 348 games while his career stats during 13 NHL seasons were 193-240-433 with 1,306 PIM's in 704 games. Following his playing career he got into coaching, first with Vancouver's IHL farm club in Milwaukee for2 seasons (1992-94) and then 4 seasons with Orlando (1995-99). On July 14, 1999, he was named head coach of the expansion Atlanta Thrashers, a position he still holds.

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37. Kevin McCarthy
Kevin McCarthy started and ended his NHL career with Philadelphia Flyers. But in between, he played his best hockey for the Vancouver Canucks. The Flyers chose the Winnipeg native in the first round (17th overall) of the 1977 Amateur Draft from that city's junior Monarchs with whom he enjoyed 2 spectacular seasons on defence, scoring 248 points. But after failing to develop with the Flyers, they sent him to Vancouver along with Drew Callander in exchange for Dennis Ververgaert on New Year's Eve, 1978. Canuck doctors discovered that he had been playing with a significant hip muscle injury, which they managed to repair and rehab over the balance of the '78-79 season. Once he recovered, his career went into high gear. In his first full season as a Canuck (1979-80), he scored 15 goals and 30 assists for 45 points and was named team captain. He then bettered those totals with 16-37-53 in 1980-81 to win the Babe Pratt Trophy as top defenceman. That performance also earned him a starting position in the 1981 NHL All Star game. He went 2 more seasons with 40+ points and was all set for the famous Canuck playoff run of 1982 when disaster struck. 2 days before post-season play began, McCarthy had an innocent-looking collision in practice with teammate Curt Fraser. The result was a fractured ankle and McCarthy could only watch as his team made its Cinderella trip to the Stanley Cup finals. After the injury, he never quite regained his form and he was traded to Pittsburgh in Jan. '84. After a season-and-a-half with the Penguins, he signed as a free agent for his second stint with the Flyers and retired at the end of the 1986-87 season. He turned to coaching within the Philadelphia organization and he remains in that profession as an assistant with the Carolina Hurricanes.

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38. Gerry O'Flaherty
Gerry O'Flaherty was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania as his father John "Peanuts" O'Flaherty played hockey at the time for the AHL Hornets. He was drafted by the Leafs in the 1970 Amateur Draft when, ironically, his dad was chief scout for the Canucks. He didn't catch on with the Leafs, however, and played primarily for their minor league affiliate in Tulsa. When the Leafs failed to protect him in June 1972, the Canucks snapped him up via the Intra-League Draft. "Flapper", as he was nicknamed, was a very versatile player who could play any forward position and he became a Vancouver regular for 6 seasons---1972-73 to 1977-78. Though he was classed as a defensive forward and often shadowed other teams' top snipers, O'Flaherty could score, too, and he enjoyed three 20+-goal seasons. He wound up his Canuck career by playing 435 games, scoring 98 goals and 95 assists for 193 points for 29th place in all-time team scoring. Upon retirement, O'Flaherty became involved in the auto muffler business. He never strayed far from the hockey scene, however, as he followed in his dad's footsteps and became to western scout for the Montreal Canadiens, a post he still holds. He's also active with the Canuck Alumni, both in their charity games and its scholarship selection program.

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39. Bobby Lalonde
Picture a water beetle with a hockey stick zipping across a calm pond and you've conjured up an image of Bobby Lalonde. At 5'5" and 155 pounds, "Newsy", as he was nicknamed after the legendary Newsy Lalonde of World War I-Era Canadiens star, was the smallest player ever to play for the Canucks. Chosen second (17th overall) in the 1971 Amateur Draft from the Montreal Junior Canadiens, Lalonde split his first pro season (1971-72) between the Canucks and their AHL Rochester farm club. The following season, he stuck with the big club all year, scoring 20-27-47 in 77 games. Always a fan favourite due to his blazing speed and nifty moves, Lalonde captured the team's Most Exciting Player Award 3 years in a row. He played 5 more seasons for the Canucks, scoring 47 points again in 1974-75, when Vancouver captured its first Smythe Division title, and reaching the 50-point plateau in 1975-76. In the latter season, he won the Molson Cup, the first year it was presented in Vancouver. Following the 1976-77 season, he was signed as a free agent by Atlanta where he enjoyed his best season of point production in 1978-79 when he had 24 goals and 32 assists for 56 points. After parts of three campaigns with the Flames, he was traded to the Boston Bruins where he played two more seasons. He finished his NHL career in 1981-82 with a brief stint with the Calgary Flames. He and his family live in Pickering, Ontario, just east of Toronto.

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40. Dana Murzyn
Dana Murzyn was a classic "stay-at-home" defenceman who played his position night after night and could best be described as steady and dependable. He was likely noticed more by his teammates and opponents rather than Canuck fans who probably don't realize that he played 452 Canuck games over 9 seasons. By the time he became a Canuck in March '91 via a 4-player deal with Calgary, Murzyn already had 6 NHL seasons under his belt. He was the first draft choice (5th overall) of Hartford in 1985 and played 2 1/2 with the Whalers before they traded him to the Flames in Jan. '88. In his first full season with Calgary (1988-89), he helped the Flames to their only Stanley Cup. As a Canuck, "Hank", as he was affectionately known, was generally paired on defence with the roving Jyrki Lumme, staying back to guard his zone as the big Finn joined the rush. They complemented one another nicely. As mentioned, Murzyn never scored many points-his highest total was 28 in 1986-87-but perhaps the best testimonial to his value can be seen in the following stats: he was a plus player in 7 of his 9 seasons here, including a plus 34 in '92-93 when he won the Babe Pratt Trophy as top defenceman, and finished his Canuck career with a combined total of plus 74. He retired at the conclusion of the 1998-99 season having played 858 NHL games, with totals of 52-152-204 and 1,571 minutes in penalties. He then returned to his hometown of Calgary, where he's involved in the meat business.

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41. Lars Lindgren
When GM Jake Milford and his Canucks unveiled new uniforms in 1978-79, they also hired new coach, Harry Neale, and began the season with 9 new players to complete the facelift. One of the newcomers that would go on to become a mainstay on defence was a big Swedish player named Lars Lindgren. Hailing from the small northern town of Pitea (the same hometown as current Canuck Mattias Ohlund), Lindgren anchored the team's blueline corps for the next 5 seasons. "Lurch", as he was known, wasn't tough, per se, but opponents always had trouble getting around him because of his fine positional play. In today's terms, he was always "in your face". His inspired play went a long way towards Vancouver's successes in the spring of 1982, when the Canucks advanced all the way to the Stanley Cup finals. Early in the 1983-84 season, he was traded to the Minnesota North Stars, but he only played the remainder of that season before retiring and returning to his homeland. All told, he played 335 Canuck games totalling 23 goals and 99 assists for 122 points. Today, he's back in Pitea where he heads up the town's recreation services. He's also the European sales rep for Brunswick pool tables and shuffleboards.

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42. Dale Tallon
Longtime Canuck fans will remember the 1970 Amateur Draft. "Evens or odds", asked NHL president Clarence Campbell? "Evens", said Vancouver GM Bud Poile. The wheel spun and landed on what Poile believed to be Roman Numeral II. The Canuck table cheered. "Hold on a minute," said Buffalo GM Punch Imlach. "That's not a Roman numeral II, it's an eleven!" The Sabres table cheered, selected Gilbert Perreault and gave him jersey No. 11. The Canucks settled for the second-best player in the draft, Dale Tallon. Tallon was actually a very good player who was sufficiently versatile to play either forward or defence. He was also a scratch golfer who nearly opted for a career in that sport. But he chose hockey and, in his rookie season (1970-71), he played all 78 games in Vancouver's inaugural NHL season, scoring 14 goals and 42 assists for 56 points. He scored 44 more points the following season and 37 the next before Poile engineered a deal which sent Tallon to the Chicago Black Hawks for defenceman Jerry Korab and goalie Gary Smith. He played 5 seasons for the Hawks and 2 more for the Pittsburgh Penguins before retiring in 1980. The well-spoken Tallon then gravitated to the broadcast booth as a colour commentator for the Hawks, a position he held until 2 seasons ago when he took over the post of Chicago's director of player personnel.

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43. Igor Larionov
When you hear the term "cloak and dagger", that's exactly the scenario that best depicts the events surrounding the arrival in Vancouver in 1989 of Soviet hockey players Igor Larionov and Vladimir Krutov. Remember, there was no such thing back then as "glasnost" or peoples' freedom of movement out of the Soviet Union. So to extract these players from the top team in the U.S.S.R. (Red Army) took many secret meetings on both sides of the Atlantic. There were only 3 other Soviet players in the NHL at that time. The efforts of then-owners, the Griffiths family, and others finally bore fruit as these elite Russians finally arrived and became Canucks. And even though Larionov played only 3 seasons for Vancouver, he remains one of the most important components in the evolution of the Canuck franchise. He was nearly 30 years old when he played his first game but, as testimony to his conditioning, he's still in the League today (with Florida). His best season was 1991-92 when he scored 21-44-65 but then his contract was up for renewal and the Canucks would have had to send to the Soviet Ice Hockey Federation the identical amount he signed for as compensation. Larionov advised the team not to do it; he would play in Europe instead (for Switzerland). A year later, those stipulations were history, but Larionov was now a free agent and the San Jose Sharks were first to get to the nifty little centre. He played 2 seasons in California then 5 more with Detroit, winning Stanley Cups in 1997 and 1998. He signed with the Panthers, again as a free agent, July 1, 2000.

44. Alex Mogilny
Alexander Mogilny is, at once, one of the most gifted yet enigmatic players ever to play for the Canucks. When he arrived in Vancouver in the summer of 1995 following a multi-player deal with the Buffalo Sabres, the Canucks knew they were getting one of the most prolific scorers in NHL history. Mogilny had played 6 seasons for Buffalo and had tallied 76 goals, 51 assists in 1992-93, so the locals were looking for big things from the Russian winger. They weren't disappointed as "Almo" went on an immediate tear, scoring 55 goals and 52 assists for 107 points in his first season with Vancouver (1995-96) to become only the second player in Canucks history (Pavel Bure was the other) to score more than 50 goals and 100 points. The next season he again led the team in scoring with 31-42-73. But then a series of nagging injuries caused him to miss 89 games over the next 3 seasons and, even when healthy, Mogilny would only show brief flashes of his former excellence. His point totals dipped to 45, 45 and 38 in 1999-2000 before the Canucks dealt him to the New Jersey Devils for Brendan Morrison and Denis Pederson at the trading deadline (March 14/00). He would go on to perform a more defensive role with the Devils, scoring 4-3-7 in 24 games enroute to his first Stanley Cup title.

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45. Doug Halward
Doug Halward enjoyed a solid 14-year NHL career with 5 different teams, but by far his best hockey was played with the Canucks. Originally a first-round draft pick of Boston's (1975), he played parts of 3 seasons for the Bruins before they shipped him to the Los Angeles Kings. The big defenceman played 3 seasons for the Kings, enjoying an 11-45-56 campaign in 1979-80, but found himself on the move again, this time to Vancouver, in March '81. He was a Canuck for nearly 6 seasons and was part of the team's drive to the finals in 1982. The following season (1982-83), he scored 19 goals and added 33 assists for 52 points to capture the Babe Pratt Trophy as Vancouver's top defenceman, plus the Fred J. Hume Award as the team's "Unsung Hero". His goal-total remained a record for Canuck defencemen until '98-99 when current rearguard Adrian Aucoin scored 23 goals. In Nov. '86, "Hawk", as he was known, was traded to Detroit where he played in parts of 3 more seasons before a final move took him to Edmonton where he played 24 games with the Oilers prior to his retirement in 1989. He and his family then returned to the Lower Mainland. The Halwards reside in Port Moody and Doug is now involved with a waste management firm.

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46. Barry Pederson
Barry Pederson was born on the prairies but moved to BC at a young age and learned his hockey in this province. He enjoyed a brilliant junior career with the Victoria Cougars from whom the Boston Bruins drafted him in the first round (18th overall) in 1980. He enjoyed 4 outstanding seasons with the Bruins, including 2 in which he exceeded 107 points, but shoulder surgery forced him to miss 58 games in 1984-85. He became a Canuck on June 6/86 when Vancouver sent Cam Neely and a 1st round draft pick to the Bruins. In his first 2 seasons here, he scored 147 points, including 104 assists as Canucks top playmaker in '86-87 and '87-88. Another injury sidelined him for 18 games the next season and then he was involved in a 6-player deal, which sent him to Pittsburgh (Jan. 8/90). After just 84 games with the Penguins, he was signed as a free agent by Hartford and then wound up his career back in Boston ('91-92). With the Canucks, he had 197 points in 233 games over 4 seasons. His overall NHL career featured 238-416-654 in 701 games. Barry's wife Patricia was a marathon runner and won the Japanese Marathon in 1987. Following his retirement as a player, he stayed in the Boston area and did colour commentary on Bruins telecasts. He's now involved in the investment business.